HerculaneuminPictures

 

 

 




Herculaneum. Villa dei Papiri or Villa of the Papyri or Villa dei Pisoni.

Part 6. Casa dei rilievi dionisiaci or House of the Dionysiac Reliefs and seaside pavilion.

The complex and atrium   Lower levels   Reconstructions, the Getty Villa and the Jashemskis   Monumental structure   Baths   House of the Dionysiac Reliefs and pavilion  Sculptures   Frescoes   Plan

On this page: House of the Dionysiac Reliefs    Seaside pavilion 

Casa dei rilievi dionisiaci or House of the Dionysiac Reliefs

 

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. 2013. Plan of villa and edge of portico of adjacent baths.
The room numbers are those used on these pompeiiinpictures pages but may differ from those found elsewhere.
See Guidobaldi, M.P. and Esposito D., 2013. Herculaneum: Art of a Buried City. New York: Abbeville Press, p. 151, fig. 123.

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. 2013. Plan of villa and edge of portico of adjacent baths.

The room numbers are those used on these Herculaneuminpictures pages but may differ from those found elsewhere.

See Guidobaldi, M.P. and Esposito D., 2013. Herculaneum: Art of a Buried City. New York: Abbeville Press, p. 151, fig. 123.

 

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. 2005. Room (m), with the red and white painted plaster, is to the right and is where the Dionysiac reliefs were found.

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. 2005. Room (m), with the red and white painted plaster, is to the right and is where the Dionysiac reliefs were found.

 

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. June 2012.
Under the metal roof, at the side of the baths complex is part of a large residential building
Looking north-east from room (q), lower left.
On the extreme left, centre of photo, is the fountain in room (p), at the rear of it is room (l3). 
In front of it, and between it and room (q), is the biclinium room (n). 
In the centre of the photo, with painted walls, is room (m), with a doorway leading south into room (o). 
On the extreme right is another room (f2), with a doorway leading north into room (o).
At the side of room (o) are rooms (u), (t) and (v).
Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. June 2012.

Under the metal roof, at the side of the baths complex is part of a large residential building

Looking north-east from room (q), lower left.

On the extreme left, centre of photo, is the fountain in room (p), at the rear of it is room (l3).

In front of it, and between it and room (q), is the biclinium room (n).

In the centre of the photo, with painted walls, is room (m), with a doorway leading south into room (o).

On the extreme right is another room (f2), with a doorway leading north into room (o).

At the side of room (o) are rooms (u), (t) and (v).

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. C.2000. Room (m). 
A copy of the first plaque found in 1997 is on display on the easel.
Photo courtesy of Jennifer F. Stephens - ©2004.

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. C.2000. Room (m).

A copy of the first plaque found in 1997 is on display on the easel.

Photo courtesy of Jennifer F. Stephens - ©2004.

 

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. July 2010. Room (m), with painted walls.
Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. July 2010. Room (m), with painted walls.

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. 2005. Looking from room (n) to room (m), with painted walls.

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. 2005. Looking from room (n) to room (m), with painted walls.

 

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. July 2010. 
Room (m), south-east corner with doorway leading to room (t), not fully excavated.
Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. July 2010.

Room (m), south-east corner with doorway leading to room (t), not fully excavated.

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

According to Guidobaldi, the room with the most interest is the large vaulted room (m), looking on high, on the east wall one can see the remains of two decorative phases of the lunette.

On the east side of the room are visible some portions of mosaic flooring with black tesserae with patches in coarse cocciopesto.

The room opens to the north with a large window onto the open area with fountain (p), while a large opening puts it in communication to the south with room (o), only partially investigated.

In the east wall there were two openings: the one at the northern extremity led into a room not included in the current section of the excavation (note the traces of the jambs and lintels of charred wood).

The pictorial decoration of the room is traceable to the IV Style.

 

Of extreme interest has been the discovery on the south wall, at 2.03 m of height from the floor, of a relief in Greek marble with two satyrs and a nymph attributable to Neo-attic production, of which a plaster-cast is now shown there.

The Relief was inserted in the central panel of the middle zone of the wall, fastened by two metal clamps.

 

Under the metal roof are the remains of the excavated area with fountain (p) and biclinium (n).

The biclinium, in poor state of preservation, preserves the preparation of a biclinium structure in masonry with rectangular basin in the corner.

On the west wall, besides the trace of a bourbon tunnel, one can observe the remains of the pictorial decoration in IV stile with grass tufts/plants.

 

On the upper terrace (best seen as one exits the site), 9 rooms have been excavated belonging to one or more dwellings and partly damaged by the passages of the tunnels.

See Guidobaldi, M.P, 2009: Ercolano, guida agli scavi. Naples, Electa Napoli, (p.132-3).

 

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. September 2014. Two marble reliefs.
Inventory number 79613 (upper) found in 1997 and inventory number 88091 (lower) found in 2009.
Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. September 2014. Two marble reliefs.

Inventory number 79613 (upper) found in 1997 and inventory number 88091 (lower) found in 2009.

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. Dionysian marble relief showing two Satyrs and a Nymph, all engaged in the pouring and drinking of wine. 
Found in 1997, on south wall. Inventory number.

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. Dionysian marble relief showing two Satyrs and a Nymph, all engaged in the pouring and drinking of wine.

Found in 1997, on south wall. Inventory number 79613.

 

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. February 2009. Room (m). The second marble relief is shown attached to the wall at the time of discovery.

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. February 2009. Room (m). The second marble relief is shown attached to the wall at the time of discovery.

 

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. June 2014. Second marble relief. Inventory number 88091.
Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.
This shows a dancing Maenad and a bearded man, probably Dionysius, facing each other on the right side.
On the left two female figures stand before an archaic Greek sculpture of Dionysius who is holding a kantharos. 
The adult woman has her hand on the shoulder of the younger one in what seems to be a protective gesture. 
The object held by the younger woman is difficult to identify, a tool or torch, perhaps related to a particular ritual.
Found on February 18, 2009 at a height of 2 metres from the soil level, built into the painted plaster facing the eastern wall of a large hall (9.80m x 6.50m). 
These reliefs were found embedded into two walls of a room whose fourth wall was open, overlooking the sea. 
There was probably a third matching relief on the third wall, but it was lost along with the wall during the eruption.
In 2009, the HCP turned its attentions to the House of the Dionysiac Reliefs to stabilize and conserve the excavated site. 
On the last day of the project, the mud caking a section of wall fell off and a second marble relief in even better condition than the first one saw the light of day for the first time since 79AD. 
Since it was found still embedded in the wall, archaeologists were given the rare opportunity to study how these panels were mounted. There was no mortar used. 
They were placed in a niche two inches deep and held in place with iron cramps, two on the long sides, one on the short sides. 
Once the panel was in place, the exposed edges were filled with painted plaster. 
Inserting marble Greek-style reliefs (typoi) was very fashionable and popular amongst wealthy Romans from the 1st century BC onwards. 
Cicero is recorded in a letter dating to 67BC asking a friend to purchase for him two marble reliefs to insert in the painted decoration of his villa in Tusculum (ad Atticum 1.10.3). 
Getting to explore the practical mechanics of their installation was of major archaeological significance.
“On the eastern end of the northern wall was a single painting of a mythological theme with the image of Cassandra”.
Details taken from the information board on site.

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. June 2014. Second marble relief. Inventory number 88091.

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

This shows a dancing Maenad and a bearded man, probably Dionysius, facing each other on the right side.

On the left two female figures stand before an archaic Greek sculpture of Dionysius who is holding a kantharos.

The adult woman has her hand on the shoulder of the younger one in what seems to be a protective gesture.

The object held by the younger woman is difficult to identify, a tool or torch, perhaps related to a particular ritual.

Found on February 18, 2009 at a height of 2 metres from the soil level, built into the painted plaster facing the eastern wall of a large hall (9.80m x 6.50m).

These reliefs were found embedded into two walls of a room whose fourth wall was open, overlooking the sea.

There was probably a third matching relief on the third wall, but it was lost along with the wall during the eruption.

In 2009, the HCP turned its attentions to the House of the Dionysiac Reliefs to stabilize and conserve the excavated site.

On the last day of the project, the mud caking a section of wall fell off and a second marble relief in even better condition than the first one saw the light of day for the first time since 79AD.

Since it was found still embedded in the wall, archaeologists were given the rare opportunity to study how these panels were mounted. There was no mortar used.

They were placed in a niche two inches deep and held in place with iron cramps, two on the long sides, one on the short sides.

Once the panel was in place, the exposed edges were filled with painted plaster.

Inserting marble Greek-style reliefs (typoi) was very fashionable and popular amongst wealthy Romans from the 1st century BC onwards.

Cicero is recorded in a letter dating to 67BC asking a friend to purchase for him two marble reliefs to insert in the painted decoration of his villa in Tusculum (ad Atticum 1.10.3).

Getting to explore the practical mechanics of their installation was of major archaeological significance.

“On the eastern end of the northern wall was a single painting of a mythological theme with the image of Cassandra”.

Details taken from the information board on site.

 

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. June 2012. Looking north from room (f2), with doorway to room (o), centre left.
On the north side of room (o) is a doorway into room (m).
Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. June 2012. Looking north from room (f2), with doorway to room (o), centre left.

On the north side of room (o) is a doorway into room (m).

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. June 2012. Looking north from room (f2), with room (q), lower left.
In the centre of the photo, on the left, is the biclinium room (n). Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.
Under the metal roof are the remains of the excavated area with fountain (p) and biclinium (n)
The biclinium, in poor state of preservation, preserves the preparation of a biclinium structure in masonry with rectangular basin in the corner.
On the west wall, besides the trace of a bourbon tunnel, one can observe the remains of the pictorial decoration in IV stile with grass tufts/plants.
See Guidobaldi, M.P, 2009: Ercolano, guida agli scavi. Naples, Electa Napoli, (p.132-3).

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. June 2012. Looking north from room (f2), with room (q), lower left.

In the centre of the photo, on the left, is the biclinium room (n). Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

Under the metal roof are the remains of the excavated area with fountain (p) and biclinium (n)

The biclinium, in poor state of preservation, preserves the preparation of a biclinium structure in masonry with rectangular basin in the corner.

On the west wall, besides the trace of a bourbon tunnel, one can observe the remains of the pictorial decoration in IV stile with grass tufts/plants.

See Guidobaldi, M.P, 2009: Ercolano, guida agli scavi. Naples, Electa Napoli, (p.132-3).

 

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. June 2012. Looking north across pool in room (p), through window into room (l3).
Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. June 2012. Looking north across pool in room (p), through window into room (l3).

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. June 2012. Room (l3), north wall.
Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. June 2012. Room (l3), north wall.

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. July 2010. 
In room (p) a fountain and pool has been found, provided with a rectangular masonry basin with upper border edged with marble, at the centre it had a masonry column pierced by a lead pipe/tube, coming from the adjoining room (l3), overlooked by a large window onto this area.  
Looking north across rectangular basin of pool towards window. On the right, east, is a window into room (m).
Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum. July 2010.

In room (p) a fountain and pool has been found, provided with a rectangular masonry basin with upper border edged with marble, at the centre it had a masonry column pierced by a lead pipe/tube, coming from the adjoining room (l3), overlooked by a large window onto this area. 

Looking north across rectangular basin of pool towards window. On the right, east, is a window into room (m).

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Seaside pavilion

 

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum, seaside pavilion, at east end of Villa dei Papiri site, June 2014. Looking west to collapsed front.
Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum, seaside pavilion, at east end of Villa dei Papiri site, June 2014. Looking west to collapsed front.

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum, seaside pavilion, at east end of Villa dei Papiri site, during the Nuovi Scavi.
According to De Simone, this villa is from the late Republican period.
See De Simone, A., 2010. Rediscovering the Villa of the Papyri in the Villa of the Papyri at Herculaneum. Berlin: De Gruyter, p. 9.

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum, seaside pavilion, at east end of Villa dei Papiri site, during the Nuovi Scavi.

According to De Simone, this villa is from the late Republican period.

See De Simone, A., 2010. Rediscovering the Villa of the Papyri in the Villa of the Papyri at Herculaneum. Berlin: De Gruyter, p. 9.

 

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum, seaside pavilion, 2009, rooms (a) to (f).
Rooms (a), (b) and (c) were richly decorated. 
Room (a) was a cubiculum diurnum with the alcove for the day bed marked off on the mosaic floor by a row of white triangles on a black ground.
Room (c) was also a cubiculum diurnum with the mosaic floor with a frieze marking off the rear alcove composed of whjite tesserae laid diagonally, surrounded by a double band of black tesserae laid orthogonally.
Room (b) was a great banqueting hall with a tripartite entrance and a pavement in diamond patterned opus sectile which had already been removed at the time of the eruption, showing that this part of the complex was undergoing restoration.
See Guidobaldi, M.P. and Esposito D., 2013. Herculaneum: Art of a Buried City. New York: Abbeville Press, p. 151, fig. 124.

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum, seaside pavilion, 2009, rooms (a) to (f).

Rooms (a), (b) and (c) were richly decorated.

Room (a) was a cubiculum diurnum with the alcove for the day bed marked off on the mosaic floor by a row of white triangles on a black ground.

Room (c) was also a cubiculum diurnum with the mosaic floor with a frieze marking off the rear alcove composed of whjite tesserae laid diagonally, surrounded by a double band of black tesserae laid orthogonally.

Room (b) was a great banqueting hall with a tripartite entrance and a pavement in diamond patterned opus sectile which had already been removed at the time of the eruption, showing that this part of the complex was undergoing restoration.

See Guidobaldi, M.P. and Esposito D., 2013. Herculaneum: Art of a Buried City. New York: Abbeville Press, p. 151, fig. 124.

 

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum, seaside pavilion, June 2012. Looking east from room (e1) across cubiculum diurnum room (c) to room (a) that mirrored it. 
Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum, seaside pavilion, June 2012. Looking east from room (e1) across cubiculum diurnum room (c) to room (a) that mirrored it. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum, seaside pavilion, June 2012. Room (a) and collapsed room (e) with room (b) to the right.
Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum, seaside pavilion, June 2012. Room (a) and collapsed room (e) with room (b) to the right.

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum, seaside pavilion, June 2012. Looking north along collapsed portico (e) and terrace (f).
Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum, seaside pavilion, June 2012. Looking north along collapsed portico (e) and terrace (f).

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum, seaside pavilion, June 2012. East edge, looking north along terrace (f). 
Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum, seaside pavilion, June 2012. East edge, looking north along terrace (f).

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum, seaside pavilion, June 2012. East end, looking north-west to portico (e) in front of room (b). 
Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

House of Dionysiac Reliefs, Herculaneum, seaside pavilion, June 2012. East end, looking north-west to portico (e) in front of banqueting hall room (b).

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

 

The complex and atrium   Lower levels   Reconstructions, the Getty Villa and the Jashemskis   Monumental structure   Baths   House of the Dionysiac Reliefs and pavilion  Sculptures   Frescoes   Plan

On this page: House of the Dionysiac Reliefs    Seaside pavilion