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Herculaneum II.2. Casa d’ Argo, or House of Argus.

Part 2.                                                        Part 1

 

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Looking south-west from west end of north portico.  Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Looking south-west from west end of north portico.

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, October 2014. Looking south-east from west portico. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

II.2 Herculaneum, October 2014. Looking south-east from west portico. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, 1842, drawings by Zahn. Painted capitals, the columns of these capitals are located in the great peristyle of the garden area (Xistus).
They are made of stucco-coated bricks and painted. It is interesting to note that many of these capitals, destroyed by the earthquake, in the year 62/63A.D. were later restored in a different style, this is also frequently noticed in Pompeii. 
See Zahn, W., 1842. Die schönsten Ornamente und merkwürdigsten Gemälde aus Pompeji, Herkulanum und Stabiae: II. Berlin: Reimer. (69)

II.2 Herculaneum, 1842, drawings by Zahn. Painted capitals, the columns of these capitals are located in the great peristyle of the garden area (Xistus).

They are made of stucco-coated bricks and painted. It is interesting to note that many of these capitals, destroyed by the earthquake, in the year 62/63A.D. were later restored in a different style, this is also frequently noticed in Pompeii.

See Zahn, W., 1842. Die schönsten Ornamente und merkwürdigsten Gemälde aus Pompeji, Herkulanum und Stabiae: II. Berlin: Reimer. (69)

 

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Looking south along west portico of peristyle.

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Looking south along west portico of peristyle.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Painted west wall of west portico.

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Painted west wall of west portico.

According to Barker –

“The frescoes on the walls of the first peristyle, and of the second storey, again consist of tiny medallions of animals inserted into a panel, with thin lines of ornamentation. In the upper storey the colour is red on a white ground. On the ground floor the lower two-thirds of the wall is black and the upper third is white”.

See Barker, E.R. (1908). Buried Herculaneum, (p.163-4).

 

II.2 Herculaneum, 1842, drawing by Zahn. Wall of large peristyle/garden on the opposite side from the roadway towards the interior of the house.

The wall was preserved by the paintings of the two floors, as well as the charred bays of the mosaic pavement of the upper floor, and is perhaps the first wall of the two ancient cities which has been preserved in this state and has been published.

 

On the wall of the first upper floor are painted lines and animals in red cinnabar on a white background. The ground floor wall is painted up to two thirds of the height on a black background, and another third on a white background. The Candelabra and other ornaments are mostly yellow, some red, below are panels with painted green plants.

See Zahn, W., 1842. Die schönsten Ornamente und merkwürdigsten Gemälde aus Pompeji, Herkulanum und Stabiae: II. Berlin: Reimer. (66)

 

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Looking west, on the right would have been the way to other living rooms, bedrooms and a terrace overlooking the sea, none of which are accessible.

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015.

Looking west, behind the rooms on the left would have been the way to other living rooms, (tablinum, atrium, etc) bedrooms and a terrace overlooking the sea, none of which are now accessible.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, 1842, drawing by Zahn. Wall of the atrium, which at the time was still half-covered. (Note the atrium is now unaccessible).
The zoccolo/plinth/dado was painted in black, with naturally coloured small paintings of animals, leaves, flowers and fruits. 
The architectural decoration was partly yellow, red, violet and blue.
(Two of the small architectural decorations from this wall can be seen below (plate 9), in original colour).
All the yellow/ochre colours of this wall will have changed to black by the heat of the volcanic mass; as has been the same for so many yellow panels, both in the recent and old excavations made in Herculaneum. This wall is perhaps the first of Herculaneum which is copied in its entirety, because at the first excavations they did not remove entire walls but were content to detach the main paintings from the walls, after which the underground spaces were again filled, while the new excavations remain uncovered.
See Zahn, W., 1842. Die schönsten Ornamente und merkwürdigsten Gemälde aus Pompeji, Herkulanum und Stabiae: II. Berlin: Reimer. (6)

II.2 Herculaneum, 1842, drawing by Zahn. Wall of the atrium, which at the time was still half-covered. (Note the atrium is now unaccessible).

The zoccolo/plinth/dado was painted in black, with naturally coloured small paintings of animals, leaves, flowers and fruits.

The architectural decoration was partly yellow, red, violet and blue.

(Two of the small architectural decorations from this wall can be seen below (plate 9), in original colour).

All the yellow/ochre colours of this wall will have changed to black by the heat of the volcanic mass; as has been the same for so many yellow panels, both in the recent and old excavations made in Herculaneum. This wall is perhaps the first of Herculaneum which is copied in its entirety, because at the first excavations they did not remove entire walls but were content to detach the main paintings from the walls, after which the underground spaces were again filled, while the new excavations remain uncovered.

See Zahn, W., 1842. Die schönsten Ornamente und merkwürdigsten Gemälde aus Pompeji, Herkulanum und Stabiae: II. Berlin: Reimer. (6)

 

II.2 Herculaneum, 1842, drawing by Zahn. The two painted decorations, in original colours, are from the wall of the atrium, as seen above
See Zahn, W., 1842. Die schönsten Ornamente und merkwürdigsten Gemälde aus Pompeji, Herkulanum und Stabiae: II. Berlin: Reimer. (9)

II.2 Herculaneum, 1842, drawing by Zahn. The two painted decorations, in original colours, are from the wall of the atrium, as seen above

See Zahn, W., 1842. Die schönsten Ornamente und merkwürdigsten Gemälde aus Pompeji, Herkulanum und Stabiae: II. Berlin: Reimer. (9)

 

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Looking south-west towards other living rooms, looking from the doorway from west portico

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015.

Looking south-west towards other living rooms, looking from the doorway from the west portico

 

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Looking towards rooms on south side from doorway in west portico. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Looking towards rooms on south side from doorway in west portico.

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Looking west through doorway from west portico.
According to Pagano – “Turning to the other side of the garden you pass into another portico that also had its garden in the middle. 
This can be said to be the most preserved part of the excavation.
The walls are painted in black, with panels surmounted by white with architectural designs of good taste and lightness, the pillar facing the door, painted in red, fluted, and with beautiful frieze above coloured stuccos was admirable. The artistic effect would have been prodigious, for the prominence that produced in their freshness the columns of white stucco against the black background of the walls around. The floor in black and white, of the room not entirely discovered, towards the right side of the door. could still be observed. The most preserved part was the one that remains under a modern masonry arch. 
The room to the left of the door was one of the best for its preservation. The walls are painted in white with panels, and the podium was red with three garlands of horizontal leaves. The wall on the right was surmounted by a graceful cornice stucco; and seen on the same wall at the top, was a beautiful painted swan. The floor was of white mosaic.
The other following room would have been used also for dinner use, in the hot season, as its great opening in the guise of a window by which to provide the food, protruding to the north, would have been very fresh in the summer season. The walls are somewhat conserved, with the podium in black surmounted by a large red band divided into squares, and above on a white background, jutting out there are large blue-coloured panels, surrounded by red bands. The flooring was in white mosaic, surrounded by double black bands.
Towards the door, passing by under a modern masonry arch, one observes the continuation of the house, which could not be further excavated, with the modern public road standing above. On this side the excavation extended much further, and almost reached to Portici, but presently, it is all covered again”.
See Pagano, N, 1870. Descrizione degli scavi di Ercolano. (p.22-25).

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Looking west through doorway from west portico.

According to Pagano – “Turning to the other side of the garden you pass into another portico that also had its garden in the middle.

This can be said to be the most preserved part of the excavation.

The walls are painted in black, with panels surmounted by white with architectural designs of good taste and lightness, the pillar facing the door, painted in red, fluted, and with beautiful frieze above coloured stuccos was admirable. The artistic effect would have been prodigious, for the prominence that produced in their freshness the columns of white stucco against the black background of the walls around. The floor in black and white, of the room not entirely discovered, towards the right side of the door. could still be observed. The most preserved part was the one that remains under a modern masonry arch.

The room to the left of the door was one of the best for its preservation. The walls are painted in white with panels, and the podium was red with three garlands of horizontal leaves. The wall on the right was surmounted by a graceful cornice stucco; and seen on the same wall at the top, was a beautiful painted swan. The floor was of white mosaic.

The other following room would have been used also for dinner use, in the hot season, as its great opening in the guise of a window by which to provide the food, protruding to the north, would have been very fresh in the summer season. The walls are somewhat conserved, with the podium in black surmounted by a large red band divided into squares, and above on a white background, jutting out there are large blue-coloured panels, surrounded by red bands. The flooring was in white mosaic, surrounded by double black bands.

Towards the door, passing by under a modern masonry arch, one observes the continuation of the house, which could not be further excavated, with the modern public road standing above. On this side the excavation extended much further, and almost reached to Portici, but presently, it is all covered again”.

See Pagano, N, 1870. Descrizione degli scavi di Ercolano. (p.22-25).

 

II.2 Herculaneum, 1842, drawing by Zahn. Wall of room in house, painted in its original colour, but room unknown. 
Zahn wrote – It is perhaps the first wall of Herculaneum that appears in colour in all its entirety. Previous excavations had all been carried out underground, in the way of mining, in the glow of lamps, not whole walls but only detached paintings. Whereas the more recent excavations made at Herculaneum from 1828 to 1838 are entirely open to the day-light; that’s why I was able to imitate everything they produced in colour.
See Zahn, W., 1842. Die schönsten Ornamente und merkwürdigsten Gemälde aus Pompeji, Herkulanum und Stabiae: II. Berlin: Reimer. (37)

II.2 Herculaneum, 1842, drawing by Zahn. Wall of room in house, painted in its original colour, but room unknown.

Zahn wrote – It is perhaps the first wall of Herculaneum that appears in colour in all its entirety. Previous excavations had all been carried out underground, in the way of mining, in the glow of lamps, not whole walls but only detached paintings. Whereas the more recent excavations made at Herculaneum from 1828 to 1838 are entirely open to the day-light; that’s why I was able to imitate everything they produced in colour.

See Zahn, W., 1842. Die schönsten Ornamente und merkwürdigsten Gemälde aus Pompeji, Herkulanum und Stabiae: II. Berlin: Reimer. (37)

 

II.2 Herculaneum, October 2014. Looking west through doorway and Bourbon tunnel under Via Mare. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

II.2 Herculaneum, October 2014. Looking west through doorway and Bourbon tunnel under Via Mare.

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

II.2, Herculaneum. May 2004.  Looking towards a re-opened Bourbon tunnel, with a second smaller peristyle, on right.

II.2, Herculaneum. May 2004. 

Looking towards a Bourbon tunnel, with a second smaller peristyle, on right.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, October 2001. Looking west through doorway from west portico towards the site of a Bourbon tunnel. On the left would be other living room, bedrooms and a terrace overlooking the sea, none of which are accessible. 
On the right is a second smaller peristyle garden. Photo courtesy of Peter Woods.

II.2 Herculaneum, October 2001. Looking west through doorway from west portico towards the site of a Bourbon tunnel

On the left would be other living room, bedrooms and a terrace overlooking the sea, none of which are accessible.

On the right is a second smaller peristyle garden. Photo courtesy of Peter Woods.

 

II.2, Herculaneum. 1964. Looking towards the south-east corner of the portico of the smaller peristyle. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details. J64f1146

II.2, Herculaneum. 1964. Looking towards the south-east corner of the portico of the smaller peristyle.

Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

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II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Looking towards north-west side and part of a second peristyle which has not been excavated, from doorway from west portico.

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015.

Looking towards north-west side and part of a second peristyle which has not been excavated, taken from doorway from west portico.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, October 2014. Looking towards north-west side and part of a second peristyle which has not been excavated, taken from doorway from west portico. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.
According to Barker – “In the second peristyle the wall was divided into five panels, with borders of fine geometrical design and architectural decorations, seen in the perspective. Along the top runs a frieze of purely decorative and very light architectural design, and without any possibly organic cohesion. Along the bottom is a frieze divided, vertically, into panels, with little pictures of birds and plants.”
See Barker, E.R. (1908). Buried Herculaneum, (p.162).

II.2 Herculaneum, October 2014.

Looking towards north-west side and part of a second peristyle which has not been excavated, taken from doorway from west portico.

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

According to Barker – “In the second peristyle the wall was divided into five panels, with borders of fine geometrical design and architectural decorations, seen in the perspective. Along the top runs a frieze of purely decorative and very light architectural design, and without any possibly organic cohesion. Along the bottom is a frieze divided, vertically, into panels, with little pictures of birds and plants.”

See Barker, E.R. (1908). Buried Herculaneum, (p.162).

 

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015.  Looking towards north-west side and part of a second peristyle which has not been excavated, taken from doorway from west portico. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. 

Looking towards north-west side and part of a second peristyle which has not been excavated, taken from doorway from west portico.

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

II.2, Herculaneum. 1964. South-east corner of smaller peristyle. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details. J64f1147

II.2, Herculaneum. 1964. South-east corner of smaller peristyle.

Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

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According to Jashemski, this second smaller peristyle with stuccoed columns and pillars connected by a low wall painted with flowers and plants.

Only the south-east corner of the portico has been excavated.

See Jashemski, W. F., 1993. The Gardens of Pompeii, Volume II: Appendices. New York: Caratzas. (p.258)

 

II.2, Herculaneum. 1964. Looking north-west. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details. J64f1148

II.2, Herculaneum. 1964. Looking north-west. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

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II.2, Herculaneum, June 2017. Looking north towards panoramic terrace on south side of large salon, on left.  On the right is the rear and lower rooms of II.1.
Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

II.2, Herculaneum, June 2017. Looking north towards panoramic terrace on south side of large salon, on top left.

On the right are the rear and lower rooms of II.1. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

II.2, Herculaneum, 1964. Looking north across panoramic terrace towards a large salon.  
These rooms are on the south side of the house. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details. J64f1143

II.2, Herculaneum, 1964. Looking north across panoramic terrace towards a large salon. 

These rooms are on the south side of the house.

Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

J64f1143

 

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Looking south-west towards panoramic terrace from large salon.

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Looking south-west towards panoramic terrace from large salon.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. West wall of large salon.

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. West wall of large salon.

 

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II.2 Herculaneum, October 2014. Looking towards west wall of large salon. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, October 2014. Looking towards west wall of large salon. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

II.2 Herculaneum, October 2014. Looking towards west wall of large salon. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Remains of central painting on west wall showing the Punishment of Dirce.

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015.

Remains of central painting on west wall showing the Punishment of Dirce.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, October 2014. Detail from painting on west wall showing punishment of Dirce. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

II.2 Herculaneum, October 2014. Detail from painting on west wall showing punishment of Dirce.

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. North-west corner of large salon.

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. North-west corner of large salon.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, October 2014. Looking towards north wall of large salon. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

II.2 Herculaneum, October 2014. Looking towards north wall of large salon. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Remains of painting in centre of north wall. 
According to Pesando and Guidobaldi, this painting, now lost, would have shown Perseus and the Medusa.

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Remains of painting in centre of north wall.

According to Pesando and Guidobaldi, this painting, now lost, would have shown Perseus and the Medusa.

See Pesando F. and Guidobaldi M., 2006. Guida archeologiche Laterza: Pompei, Oplontis, Ercolano, Stabia. Rome: Laterza, p. 314.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, 1839 drawing of painting of Perseus beheading Medusa, with the help of Minerva. North wall of large salon.  See Real Museo Borbonico, XII, Tav. XLVIII.
According to Pagano and Prisciandaro, this painting was discovered in 1828, (St.Erc 558). 
On 15th June 1829 (St.Erc 561), - “His Majesty has ordered that you quickly cut and transport to the Royal Bourbon Museum the painting existing in one of the walls at Herculaneum showing Perseus cutting off the head of Medusa. Il Mar.Gius.Ruffo ad Arditi.
(15 giu 1829 - “Sua majesta ha ordinate che si tagli subito e si trasporti al Museo Reale borbonico la pitture esistente in una delle pareti di Ercolano rappresentante Perseo che tronca la testa a Medusa. Il Mar.Gius.Ruffo ad Arditi.)
See Pagano, M. and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli.  Naples: Nicola Longobardi. (p.225).

II.2 Herculaneum, 1839 drawing of painting of Perseus beheading Medusa, with the help of Minerva. North wall of large salon.

See Real Museo Borbonico, XII, Tav. XLVIII.

According to Pagano and Prisciandaro, this painting was discovered in 1828, (St.Erc 558).

On 15th June 1829, (St. Erc 561), -

“His Majesty has ordered that you quickly cut and transport to the Royal Bourbon Museum the painting existing in one of the walls at Herculaneum showing Perseus cutting off the head of Medusa. Il Mar. Gius. Ruffo to Arditi.

(15 giu 1829 - “Sua majesta ha ordinate che si tagli subito e si trasporti al Museo Reale borbonico la pitture esistente in una delle pareti di Ercolano rappresentante Perseo che tronca la testa a Medusa. Il Mar. Gius. Ruffo ad Arditi.)

See Pagano, M. and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli.  Naples: Nicola Longobardi. (p.225).

 

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II.2 Herculaneum, May 2004. Looking north-east across peristyle.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Looking north across peristyle.

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Looking north across peristyle.

 

II.1 Herculaneum, September 2015. Looking north towards peristyle, through the doorway formed from a Bourbon tunnel.

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015.

Looking north towards peristyle, through the doorway formed from a Bourbon tunnel, from II.1.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Looking north along east portico of peristyle.
According to Maiuri, on the upper floor around the peristyle were living rooms and storerooms. These comprised of six rooms. Upon excavation, found stored in the storerooms was a large quantity of well-preserved cereals and other comestibles.
The upper floor had been very well preserved when first excavated in the eighteenth century, but was lost after the abandonment of excavations in 1875.
See Pesando, F. and Guidobaldi, M.P. (2006). Pompei, Oplontis, Ercolano, Stabiae. Editori Laterza, (p.314-5)
See Maiuri, Amedeo, (1977). Herculaneum. 7th English ed, of Guide books to the Museums Galleries and Monuments of Italy, No.53 (p.23-24).
According to Wallace-Hadrill, “by the 1850’s the precious upper floors of the House of Aristides had to be propped up.”
See Wallace-Hadrill, A. (2011). Herculaneum, Past and Future. London, Frances Lincoln Ltd., (p.58)

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Looking north along east portico of peristyle.

According to Maiuri, on the upper floor around the peristyle were living rooms and storerooms.

These comprised of six rooms.

Upon excavation, found stored in the storerooms was a large quantity of well-preserved cereals and other comestibles.

The upper floor had been very well preserved when first excavated in the eighteenth century, but was lost after the abandonment of excavations in 1875.

See Pesando, F. and Guidobaldi, M.P. (2006). Pompei, Oplontis, Ercolano, Stabiae. Editori Laterza, (p.314-5)

See Maiuri, Amedeo, (1977). Herculaneum. 7th English ed, of Guide books to the Museums Galleries and Monuments of Italy, No.53 (p.23-24).

 

II.2 Herculaneum, August 2013. Looking north along east portico. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

II.2 Herculaneum, August 2013. Looking north along east portico. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, August 2013. Looking west across peristyle, at its southern end.
Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

II.2 Herculaneum, August 2013. Looking west across peristyle, at its southern end.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Looking across peristyle from east portico.

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Looking across peristyle from south end of east portico.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, October 2014. Looking north-west along east portico of peristyle. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

II.2 Herculaneum, October 2014. Looking north-west along east portico of peristyle. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, August 2013. Looking north-west across peristyle from east portico.
Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

II.2 Herculaneum, August 2013. Looking north-west across peristyle from east portico.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, 1964. Looking north-west across peristyle. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details. J64f1145

II.2 Herculaneum, 1964. Looking north-west across peristyle. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

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II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. One of five small rooms located on the east side of the peristyle probably used as a repository.

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015.

One of five small ground-floor rooms located on the east side of the peristyle probably used as a repository.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Second of five small rooms located on the east side of the peristyle probably used as a repository.

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015.

Second of five small ground-floor rooms located on the east side of the peristyle probably used as a repository.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Third of five small ground-floor rooms located on the east side of the peristyle probably used as a repository. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015.

Third of five small ground-floor rooms located on the east side of the peristyle probably used as a repository.

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Third of five small rooms located on the east side of the peristyle probably used as a repository.

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015.

Third of five small ground-floor rooms located on the east side of the peristyle probably used as a repository.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Fourth of five small rooms located on the east side of the peristyle probably used as a repository.

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015.

Fourth of five small ground-floor rooms located on the east side of the peristyle probably used as a repository.

 

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015. Fifth of five small rooms located on the east side of the peristyle probably used as a repository.

II.2 Herculaneum, September 2015.

Fifth of five small ground-floor rooms located on the east side of the peristyle probably used as a repository.

 

II.2, Herculaneum, 1957. Looking south along east side of peristyle. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details. J57f0432

II.2, Herculaneum, 1957. Looking south along east side of peristyle. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

J57f0432

 

II.2 Herculaneum, 1842, drawing by Zahn. Showing a cross-section of the house, from east side near doorway (on left), across first peristyle, then across corridor between second peristyle and inaccessible rooms on the west side, under Via Mare.
See Zahn, W., 1842. Die schönsten Ornamente und merkwürdigsten Gemälde aus Pompeji, Herkulanum und Stabiae: II. Berlin: Reimer. (65). 
Written under (65) – The floor was restored here according to the fragments found during the search. There are now only a few walls left from the upper floor with their paintings. The paintings on the ground floor are mostly very unrecognisable, as are the colours of the capitals of the columns, shown above. On most of the architraves of the columns, iron bars, subject to iron nails, which were hung from curtains, were still observed to guarantee against any bad weather and the hot sun. Several stones of the floor and the ground floor are mosaic, but in many places are also in broken bricks, joined by mortar.

II.2 Herculaneum, 1842, drawing by Zahn. Showing a cross-section of the house, from east side near doorway (on left), across first peristyle, then across corridor between second peristyle and inaccessible rooms on the west side, under Via Mare.

See Zahn, W., 1842. Die schönsten Ornamente und merkwürdigsten Gemälde aus Pompeji, Herkulanum und Stabiae: II. Berlin: Reimer. (65).

Written under (65) – The floor was restored here according to the fragments found during the search. There are now only a few walls left from the upper floor with their paintings. The paintings on the ground floor are mostly very unrecognisable, as are the colours of the capitals of the columns, shown above. On most of the architraves of the columns, iron bars, subject to iron nails, which were hung from curtains, were still observed to guarantee against any bad weather and the hot sun. Several stones of the floor and the ground floor are mosaic, but in many places are also in broken bricks, joined by mortar.

 

 

Part 1