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Herculaneum. Villa dei Papiri or Villa of the Papyri or Villa dei Pisoni.

Part 8. Frescoes.

The complex and atrium   Lower levels   Reconstructions, the Getty Villa and the Jashemskis   Monumental structure   Baths   House of the Dionysiac Reliefs and pavilion  Sculptures   Frescoes   Plan

On this page  Moormann’s analysis   The Frescoes   Missing Frescoes   Not yet photographed   The full list

Frescoes

Moormann’s analysis

 

According to Moormann,

“in 1984 I was able to individuate 24 fragments of paintings cut out during the campaigns of Karl Weber in the 1750s throughout the villa complex and these could be attributed to two phases of the villa: the middle of the 1st century BC and the later decades of the 1st century AD, that means to the mid Second Style and to the Fourth Style. The original location of the various fragments was partly reconstructed on the basis of Weber’s fantastic documentation, conveniently collected by Comparetti and De Petra in 1882. When we now enter the villa, we see that the 18th-century excavators stripped quite a lot, so that bare walls were left. I, first, want to take up some of the conclusions drawn in the 1984 paper, and then pass to the murals which can be studied nowadays in the part excavated by Antonio De Simone in the 1990s.

 

Fourth Style

 

As to the fragments of the Fourth Style, it must be said that they are small and rather insignificant, showing small figural motifs cut out of larger wall systems that cannot be reconstructed at all. I think that their original location might have been one of the porticos of the small and/or big peristyle, where a paratactic scheme of panels would do well. The small goat could have adorned a dado, whereas the putto might be reset as a vignette into a panel decoration. The small landscapes, for instance, seem to have formed vignettes on panels, but we also know them as adornments in aediculae in upper zones of the walls or in small friezes between two horizontal layers of the wall systems. They are sketchy, what does not mean that their quality is poor, but it cannot be established whether they belong to high-quality wall decorations. We may recall the decorations in the House of the Dioscuri or the House of the Vettii at Pompeii or the Villa of San Marco at Stabiae with similar decoration systems.

 

It is sad that I am not able – like none of the painting experts would be – to propose a precise chronology nor can I ascribe them to determinate rooms. The first question is more important, as we have the hypothesis that the villa was out of use around AD 79, when the book scrolls, to mention one of the capital finds only, were collected unsystematically on scaffoldings and in crates in a room not far from the atrium and some of the garden statues were standing under the portico. Apparently, there were reconstruction works going on, like we know from other villas in the Vesuvius area, e.g. the Villa A, so-called of Poppaea at Oplontis. Some new Fourth-Style paintings were discovered in the so-called basis villae. I return to them shortly.

 

Second Style

 

As far as I could deduce from the excavation reports, the fragments found in the Villa of the Papyri belonging to the Second Style, stem from the atrium and the adjacent rooms. Here we find an interesting challenge in confronting the old reconstructions to the modern finds. There are two substantial, large panels, well known and, as the Italians say, pubblicatissimi. One shows a monochrome landscape, the other has a marble veneer imitation against which are hanging three geese and lying two deer. As to the landscape, I made a reconstruction of a panel decoration in which a meander was included, found in the villa and partly reused in the panel with the animals. This would form a series of imitations of reliefs like those in the Villa of Oplontis or on the fragment shown here in the Naples Museum. Since this very part of the villa has been reopened during De Simone’s excavations, it is possible to assess my reconstruction. So, the first observation is that the landscape monochrome does not stem from the atrium itself. This will have its consequence for the attribution of all Second-Style fragments.

 

The right ala shows on the eastern side wall the higher part of the middle zone, with a panel decoration mainly in red. Columns with the surface showing the structure of a palm tree, separate the central panel from the lateral ones. No precise cuttings due to the Bourbon activities can be observed. On top, the lower parts of blue blocks can be observed. There are two features that enable us to ascribe the monochrome landscape to this room: the dark-red band with the flower wreath and the moulding in light red-orange next to it on the wall are also present on the landscape in Naples. And of course, there is the landscape motif itself, as we see on the next image.

 

As to the shrubby columns, I show the right wall of the megalography from Terzigno, also dating to the middle of the first century BC. Since the red band is also featuring on the fragment with the highly suggestive meander, on which a tiny branch stands in a square angle, I placed it on top of the landscape in my reconstruction. However. The colour of the tiny band is yellow instead of white and it must now be excluded from the ala system. The yellow colour on the landscape in Naples is absent on all the walls in the villa itself, but this is no strange oddity: the yellow is a discoloration caused by the hot temperature of the volcanic material that filled the room. In my article I had said the opposite, standing on remarks by Pompeianisti like Paul Herrmann and Agnes Allroggen-Bedel, but here the find of the original walls is conclusive. I show you, as an example, the wall in the open-air triclinium of the House of Neptune and Amphitrite, where one panel with the garden depictions has a yellow background, the other a red one, the red being the original surface. Apparently, the hottest stuff arrived in the lower and central sections and afflicted the murals in those spots especially.

 

When we come to a relocation of the landscape, the following, first, suggestion can be done. In sum we can reconstruct a system of panels in both alae. The long walls had three reliefs with landscapes, the small ones two, if we do not take into account the doors and/or windows. Unfortunately, as to the lower and upper zones too little data are available. I was not able to establish the exact spot where the paintings with the large still lives had been cut out. As a system, it does not differ from the panel paintings with the landscapes. The animals are hanging from red orthostats, whereas three fragments, including this big piece, have animals tied at their legs lying on a green bench-like structure. This ‘bench’ is likely to be interpreted as the always green podium that we already saw in the Terzigno painting and that features in many other paintings as well. It suggests a protruding dado on which columns could be placed, like those we saw on the ala paintings ad like those surrounding a jutting aedicula on the famous fragment in Naples from the Insula Occidentalis at Pompeii, that I also show as a parallel for the large still lives. As you see, the deer lie on a slab of slate or a slate-like stone that rests on a red under layer, the top side of the dado. The aedicula of the Insula Occidentalis also has a single slab, now of fake red porphyry that covers the green top layer of the podium.

 

Our fragment contains a small part of a meander and now I believe that this indeed belonged to the system. As I said, the colour of the floral band is yellow. I show it with the addition made by the restorers at Portici – has green vertical borders and cannot be re-pieced in the way of the fragment at Naples. These borders are also present on our ala paintings. The fragment has a width of 105 cm and a height of 119 cm, that with the landscape measures 67 by 87 cm. The height of the still life panel is almost complete, except for the upper frame. shows a rather insignificant element: a panther’ s head serving as an appliqué. The excavators found fake doors, furnished with a doorstep in marble! We must assume the presence of fake doors in painting, for we which we know real examples.

 

I turn back a moment to the still life that might belong to a system like that of the Insula Occidentalis. In some more rooms are tiny fragments. I want to show one peculiar find, viz. a system with a large

almost nude woman standing in front of a red slab. She wears a mantle blown by the wind and sports a green branch in her right hand. The size of almost one metre is an indication to see here a fragment of a megalography. I refer again to the Terzigno megalography.

 

Fourth Style

 

Finally, the Fourth Style. It was a great surprise to see that the pilasters of the portico in front of these rooms are adorned with a fantastic marble veneer. The way of representation is typical for the Fourth Style. Walking around Herculaneum, I did not find other instances, but saw some real marble revetments, e.g. in the Casa del rilievo di Telefo. It is a decoration custom introduced according to Pliny in the era of Claudius, but Nero set a trend with his Golden House. It is likely that the cases in Pompeii and Herculaneum were applied after Nero’s death in AD 68. That might be a chronological indication for the fourth style n our complex.

 

As to the fourth style in the Basis villae, I think that it is a typical example of Herculaneum Fourth Style. It has been observed by various scholars, but not worked out in detail, that the fourth style in Herculaneum differs considerably from that in Pompeii. In the first place, there are much less figural scenes and, if they are present, they are huge or small! There seems to exist a tendency for monochrome panels in the central zone and fantastic upper zones, often in different colours, e.g. in the House of the Tuscan Colonnade. Here we might refer to the House of the Black Saloon and a house in front of the palaestra, the latter especially because of the great contrast between the heavily red main zone and eerie upper zone.

 

As a conclusion, something can be learnt: the owners appreciated all time long the Second Style and kept it well preserved for almost 140 years. The Fourth Style seems to stem from the last decade and has a precious elegance, typical for Herculaneum.”

 

See Moormann E. M., 2009. Pitture parietali nella Villa dei Papiri a Ercolano :Vecchi rinvenimenti e nuove scoperte, in Vesuviana. Archeologia a confronto. Atti del Convegno internazionale (Bologna, 14-16 gennaio 2008), Tavola 1.

 

The Frescoes

 

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Atrium (c). Meander fresco.
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 8548.
According to Esposito, the upper part of the atrium's walls was decorated with a perspective meandering frieze, of which a fragment was recovered during the eighteenth-century explorations. 
The relevance of this piece to the decoration of the atrium, for a long time discussed, can now be confirmed by the discovery of a small fragment of painted plaster that exhibits a purple bottom band, next to which is painted a green band and adorned with a stylized floral element with eight petals, fielded in orange with cream white highlights. 
The motive of the perspective meander is very frequent in the pavement and parietal decorations of the late Republican age. In particular it is often used as a frieze placed to crown the median area.
See Esposito D., 2010. Le pitture della Villa dei Papiri ad Ercolano in La Villa Romaine de Boscoreale et ses Fresques. Édicions errance: Musée royal de Mariemont. p. 214, fig. 6.

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Atrium (c). Meander fresco.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 8548.

According to Esposito, the upper part of the atrium's walls was decorated with a perspective meandering frieze, of which a fragment was recovered during the eighteenth-century explorations.

The relevance of this piece to the decoration of the atrium, for a long time discussed, can now be confirmed by the discovery of a small fragment of painted plaster that exhibits a purple bottom band, next to which is painted a green band and adorned with a stylized floral element with eight petals, fielded in orange with cream white highlights.

The motive of the perspective meander is very frequent in the pavement and parietal decorations of the late Republican age. In particular it is often used as a frieze placed to crown the median area.

See Esposito D., 2010. Le pitture della Villa dei Papiri ad Ercolano in La Villa Romaine de Boscoreale et ses Fresques. Édicions errance: Musée royal de Mariemont. p. 214, fig. 6.

 

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Atrium (c). Fresco of two cocks with realistic plumage.
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 8753. 
According to Esposito, Agnes Allroggen-Bedel has attributed to the decoration of the atrium two other fragments, which Weber placed in a different area of the villa, that of the so-called "stufa", or small room that opens to the south-east of room V, the so-called "library". In the first fragment, on a light pink background that looks very much like that of the fragment with ducks and roe deer, one sees two cocks, with the plumage rendered in a very realistic way.
See Esposito D., 2010. Le pitture della Villa dei Papiri ad Ercolano in La Villa Romaine de Boscoreale et ses Fresques. édicions errance: Musée royal de Mariemont. p. 212, fig. 4.

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Atrium (c). Fresco of two cocks with realistic plumage.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 8753.

According to Esposito, Agnes Allroggen-Bedel has attributed to the decoration of the atrium two other fragments, which Weber placed in a different area of the villa, that of the so-called "stufa", or small room that opens to the south-east of room V, the so-called "library". In the first fragment, on a light pink background that looks very much like that of the fragment with ducks and roe deer, one sees two cocks, with the plumage rendered in a very realistic way.

See Esposito D., 2010. Le pitture della Villa dei Papiri ad Ercolano in La Villa Romaine de Boscoreale et ses Fresques. édicions errance: Musée royal de Mariemont. p. 212, fig. 4.

 

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Found 16th June 1764. Atrium (c). Fresco of several ducks hanging and two roe deer sitting.
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 8759. 
In the upper part of the wall are four suspended ducks, with tied legs, three of which are still live, with their heads raised, the fourth, now dead, with a dangling head. On a green shelf are depicted two roe deer, legs tied with a red string.
See Esposito D., 2010. Le pitture della Villa dei Papiri ad Ercolano in La Villa Romaine de Boscoreale et ses Fresques. édicions errance: Musée royal de Mariemont. p. 212, fig. 2.

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Found 16th June 1764. Atrium (c). Fresco of several ducks hanging and two roe deer sitting.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 8759.

In the upper part of the wall are four suspended ducks, with tied legs, three of which are still live, with their heads raised, the fourth, now dead, with a dangling head. On a green shelf are depicted two roe deer, legs tied with a red string.

See Esposito D., 2010. Le pitture della Villa dei Papiri ad Ercolano in La Villa Romaine de Boscoreale et ses Fresques. édicions errance: Musée royal de Mariemont. p. 212, fig. 2.

 

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Fresco of panther with ring and rhyton.
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 8779.

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Fresco of panther with ring and rhyton.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 8779.

 

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Fresco of goat.
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 8806.

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Fresco of goat.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 8806.

 

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Fresco of Medusa head.
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 8821A.

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Fresco of Medusa head.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 8821A.

 

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Fresco of Medusa head.
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum.

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Fresco of Medusa head.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum.

 

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Fresco of winged cupid with cup and baton.
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9319.

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Fresco of winged cupid with cup and baton.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9319.

 

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Fresco of sacred landscape.
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9399.

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Fresco of sacred landscape.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9399.

 

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. East wall of ala (d). Monochrome landscape fresco.
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9423.
According to Esposito, the observation of the remains still in situ in the two alae and of the fragments detached during the excavation of the end of the last century from the ala (d) confirm the provenance of these environments, most likely from the east wall of the ala (d) of the two fragments with monochromatic landscapes preserved at the Naples Museum. 
Imitating panels of orthostats decorated with monochrome are often used in the middle of the II style walls. 
The closest comparison can be established with the monochrome landscapes painted in the antechamber of the triclinium (14) of the villa A of Oplontis. At other times the monochrome panels are placed inside an aedicula located in the centre of the wall, as seen in room (23) of the same villa in Oplontis, or in the two fragments from the so-called villa of the Royal Stables in Portici.
See Esposito D., 2010. Le pitture della Villa dei Papiri ad Ercolano in La Villa Romaine de Boscoreale et ses Fresques. édicions errance: Musée royal de Mariemont. p. 215, figg. 7, 8, 9.

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. East wall of ala (d). Monochrome landscape fresco.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9423.

According to Esposito, the observation of the remains still in situ in the two alae and of the fragments detached during the excavation of the end of the last century from the ala (d) confirm the provenance of these environments, most likely from the east wall of the ala (d) of the two fragments with monochromatic landscapes preserved at the Naples Museum.

Imitating panels of orthostats decorated with monochrome are often used in the middle of the II style walls.

The closest comparison can be established with the monochrome landscapes painted in the antechamber of the triclinium (14) of the villa A of Oplontis. At other times the monochrome panels are placed inside an aedicula located in the centre of the wall, as seen in room (23) of the same villa in Oplontis, or in the two fragments from the so-called villa of the Royal Stables in Portici.

See Esposito D., 2010. Le pitture della Villa dei Papiri ad Ercolano in La Villa Romaine de Boscoreale et ses Fresques. édicions errance: Musée royal de Mariemont. p. 215, figg. 7, 8, 9.

 

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. East wall of ala (d). Two fragments of fresco.
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number s. n.
According to Esposito, the observation of the remains still in situ in the two alae and of the fragments detached during the excavation of the end of the last century from the ala (d) confirm the provenance in these rooms, most likely from the east wall of the ala (d), of the two fragments with monochromatic landscapes preserved at the Naples Museum. 
See Esposito D., 2010. Le pitture della Villa dei Papiri ad Ercolano in La Villa Romaine de Boscoreale et ses Fresques. édicions errance: Musée royal de Mariemont. p. 215, fig. 7.

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. East wall of ala (d). Two fragments of fresco.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number s. n.

According to Esposito, the observation of the remains still in situ in the two alae and of the fragments detached during the excavation of the end of the last century from the ala (d) confirm the provenance in these rooms, most likely from the east wall of the ala (d), of the two fragments with monochromatic landscapes preserved at the Naples Museum.

See Esposito D., 2010. Le pitture della Villa dei Papiri ad Ercolano in La Villa Romaine de Boscoreale et ses Fresques. édicions errance: Musée royal de Mariemont. p. 215, fig. 7.

 

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Oecus (g). South wall, east part. 
Fresco fragment of a panel with branch entering from a window.
A red-brown wall has a small window facing an open space, of which only the blue of the sky can be recognized. 
From the grating of the window hangs a branch of vine on which is hung a yellow ribbon. 
The wall is completed at the top by a golden shelf largely occupied by a pinax with doors, seen in perspective.
The two open doors, allow a glimpse of a female figure standing, with a grey-blue dress, covered with a yellow coat. 
Above this is a coffered ceiling in perspective, which suggests the presence of another room.
See Esposito D., 2010. Le pitture della Villa dei Papiri ad Ercolano in La Villa Romaine de Boscoreale et ses Fresques. édicions errance: Musée royal de Mariemont. p. 217, fig. 11.

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Oecus (g). South wall, east part.

Fresco fragment of a panel with branch entering from a window.

A red-brown wall has a small window facing an open space, of which only the blue of the sky can be recognized.

From the grating of the window hangs a branch of vine on which is hung a yellow ribbon.

The wall is completed at the top by a golden shelf largely occupied by a pinax with doors, seen in perspective.

The two open doors, allow a glimpse of a female figure standing, with a grey-blue dress, covered with a yellow coat.

Above this is a coffered ceiling in perspective, which suggests the presence of another room.

See Esposito D., 2010. Le pitture della Villa dei Papiri ad Ercolano in La Villa Romaine de Boscoreale et ses Fresques. édicions errance: Musée royal de Mariemont. p. 217, fig. 11.

 

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Fresco of sacred landscape.
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9458.

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Fresco of sacred landscape.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9458.

 

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Fresco of sacred landscape.
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9499.

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Fresco of sacred landscape.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9499.

 

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Fresco of goat. 
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9902.

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Fresco of goat.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9902.

 

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Still life fresco. 
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9944.

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Still life fresco.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9944.

 

A close up of a sign

Description generated with high confidence

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Atrium (c). Fresco of feline head with ring in mouth.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9951.

According to Esposito, this is the second piece from the atrium (c) identified by Allroggen-Bedel.

It shows a Panther head, on a yellow background, with a bronze ring between the jaws which refers to the decoration of the false doors that mark the long walls of the atrium.

See Esposito D., 2010. Le pitture della Villa dei Papiri ad Ercolano in La Villa Romaine de Boscoreale et ses Fresques. édicions errance: Musée royal de Mariemont. p. 213, fig. 3.

 

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Fresco possibly Medusa, possibly Alexander?
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum.

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Fresco possibly Medusa, possibly Alexander?

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum.

 

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Atrium (c). Fresco of two birds.
According to Moormann this fragment, is from the atrium (c) and is of octagonal form and rather faded, in which one recognizes a duck and another bird painted with natural tones.
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number s. n.
See Esposito D., 2010. Le pitture della Villa dei Papiri ad Ercolano in La Villa Romaine de Boscoreale et ses Fresques. édicions errance: Musée royal de Mariemont, p. 212-3, fig. 5.

Villa dei Papiri, Herculaneum. Atrium (c). Fresco of two birds.

According to Moormann this fragment, is from the atrium (c) and is of octagonal form and rather faded, in which one recognizes a duck and another bird painted with natural tones.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number s. n.

See Esposito D., 2010. Le pitture della Villa dei Papiri ad Ercolano in La Villa Romaine de Boscoreale et ses Fresques. édicions errance: Musée royal de Mariemont, p. 212-3, fig. 5.

 

Missing frescoes

 

Paesaggio - perduto

Natura morta, anatra - perduta

Natura morta, anatra - perduta

Natura morta; brocca - perduta

Testa di donna - perduta

Cavalli marini - perduti

Uccello - perduto

Pantera - perduta

Pantera - perduta

 

Those we have no photographs of as yet

 

9447

9465 paesaggio

9467 paesaggio

9891 brocca

S.n. 31

Anatra stante

Anatra ed uccello sospesi

Meandro

 

The full list from Moormann

Moormann Tavola 1: Tavola dei frammenti trovati nel Villa dei Papiri nel settecento.

 

 

INV. NAPOLI

COM PARETTI-DE PETRA 1882 (P. E DATA)

ALLROGGEN-

BEDEL 1976;

1983

MOORMANN

1984

WOJCIK 1986

PAGANO- PRISCIANDARO

2006

See Note 31

 

8548 meandro

283 no. 107 (10-03-1754)

86 n. 10; 66 n.

10

643-644, figg.

9-10

17 cat. 4, pl.

VA

 

211

 

8753 due galli

282 no. 98 (24-03-1754)

87-88  n. 12;

67-68 n. 12

 

639, 642 fig. 4

22 cat. 10, pl.

VII

 

211

 

8759 anatre e daini

282,no. 97

(10-06-1754;

30-06-1754:

piccoli elementi per aggiustare)

 

87-88 n. 15,

fig. 2; 67-68 n.

15 fig. 2

 

639-640, fig. 2

 

15-16 cat. 1,

pl. IV

 

211

 

8779 pantera

283 no. 103

(17-02-1754)

 

653, fig. 14 (erroneamente: tigre)

21 cat. 8, pl.

VB

 

210

 

8806 capra

283 no. 101

(07-04-1754)

 

655-656 , fig.

20

29 cat. 16, pl.

XIII

211 [erronea- mente inv. 8662]

8818 Medusa

 

 

671, fig. 29

 

 

8820 Medusa

 

 

671 , fig. 30

 

 

 

8821A Medusa

282 no. 96c

(15-06-1 755)

 

 

657 , fig. 28

31-32 car. 23 , pl. XVIII

 

212

 

8821B Medusa

281 no. 926

(15-06-1755)

 

 

657 fig. 25

31-32 cat. 23, pl. XVIII

 

212

 

8821C Medusa

281 no. 92 (15-

06-1755)

 

 

657,fig. 24

30-31 cat. 21,

pl. XVI

 

212

 

8821D Sileno

282 no. 96c

(22-06-1755)

 

 

657, fig. 27

34 cat. 30, pl.

XXI

 

213

 

8821E Sileno

281 no. 926

(15-06-1755)

 

 

657,fig. 26

34-35 cat. 31, pl. XXII

 

212

 

9319 putto

281 no. 90 (20-

05-1753)

 

 

652, fig. 13

25-26 cat. 14,

pl. X

 

210

9399

paesaggio

281 no. 956

(24-02-1754)

 

643-644, figg.

8, 10

 

 

9423

paesaggio

283 no. 106

[perduto]

85-88,fig. l; 65-68 fig. 1

643-644, figg.

8, 10

18-19 cat. 7,

pl. VI

 

9447

 

 

 

 

212,n. 225

(15-06-1755)

9458

paesaggio

282 no. 95 (17-

02-1754)

 

 

654, fig. 17

21 cat. 9 [erroneamente inv.

9439]

 

210

9465

paesaggio

282 no. 95e

(15-06-1755)

 

 

656,fig. 21

 

32 cat. 24

 

9467

paesaggio

281-282 no.

95d (15-06-

1755)

 

 

656, fig. 22

33 cat. 26, pl.

XIX

 

9499

paesaggio

281 no. 95c

(16-03-1755)

 

 

654, fig. 16

21-22 cat. 21,

pl. XVI

212 (15-06-

1755)

 

9891 brocca

281 no. 95c

(16-0 3-1755)

 

 

 

212 (15-06-

1754)

 

9902 capra

283 no. 102

(27- 10-1754)

 

 

655, fig. 19

29 cat. 17, pl.

XIV

212 [senza no.

inv. ]

9944

natura morta

283 no. 105

(22-06-1755)

 

 

653, fig. 15

34 cat. 29, pl.

XX

 

213

9951

testa di felino

282 no. 96 (24-

0 3-1754)

87-88 n. 12-14;

67-68 n. 12-14

 

642, fig. 7

22-23 cat. 11, pl. VIII

211, 213 (22-06-1755: due teste di tigre)

S.n. 31

See note 32

 

 

656, fig. 23

 

 

Anatra stante

282, no. 99

(23-06-1754)

88 n. 19; 68 o.

19

639, fig. 5

16 cat. 2.

 

Anatra ed uccello sospesi

282, no. 99b

(23-06-1754)

88  n. 18;

68 n. 18

 

639, fig. 6

 

16-17 cat. 3.

 

211

Meandro

See note 33

283  no. 107b

(17-03-1754)

1976, 66;

1983, 66

639-640, fig. 3

17-18 cat. 5

 

Paesaggio

- perduto

173,

281 no. 94

86  n. 5;

66 0  . 5

 

643

 

18 cat. 6

 

212

Natura morta, anatra

- perduta

283 no. 100

(05-01-1755)

 

 

639

 

29-30 cat. 18

1 212

(12-01-1755)

Natura morta, anatra

- perduta

283 no. 99

(05-01- 175 5)

 

 

639

 

30cat.19

? 212

(05-01-1755)

Natura morta; brocca

- perduta

283 no. 104

(17-06-1755 )

 

 

653

 

32 cat. 25

 

Testa di donna - perduta

281 no. 93 (09-

05-1 753)

 

651

25 cat. 13

210

Cavalli marini

- perduti

281 no. 91 (20-

06-1751)

 

650-6 51

27-28 cat. 15

 

Uccello

- perduto

(20-06-1 751)

 

651

 

 

Uccello

- perduto

(20-06-1 751)

 

651

 

 

 

Pantera

- perduta

 

283 no. 103b

(22-06-1755)

 

 

653

 

33 cat. 27

213 [erroneamente inv. 9891; vedi sopra]

 

Pantera

- perduta

 

283 no. 10 3c

(22 -06-1755)

 

 

653

 

33 cat. 28

213 [erroneamente inv. 9891; vedi sopra]

 

31 Pagano - Prisciandaro 2006, pp. 206-217.

Aggiungo le date, quando mancano, o differiscono da Comparetti-De Petra 1882.

I add dates, when they are missing, or differ from Comparetti-De Petra 1882.

 

32 S.n.: senza numero d’inventario.

 

33 Forse inserito in MANN 8759 (Allroggen-Bedel 1976, p. 87; 1983, p. 67; Moormann 1984, 639-640 n. 11).

 

 

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